Thursday, March 26, 2009

Brain-Vomit rocks but Duplicity sucks

The Christmas movie is cracking along – I don’t know about 21 days but brain-vomiting on the page sure is productive. I guess, like most writers, my biggest problem is thinking too much before I write - well if you have to write 10 pages in a day (especially after work), you soon get cured of that!

Went to see Duplicity tonight and was sorely disappointed. This corporate spy-caper has all it needs on paper to be a sparking hit but it misfires all over the place.

Yes, Julia Roberts is on top form and should come out of her self-imposed retirement permanently. And the supporting cast are all excellent. But Clive Owen is completely wrong in what should have been George Clooney’s role and his chemistry with Roberts is non-existent. He is sarcastic and sardonic where the part calls for a schmoozer and he doesn’t the comic timing that you take for granted in someone like Clooney.

I’d advise you to do what I should have done – wait for the DVD…

Brain-Vomit rocks but Duplicity sucks

The Christmas movie is cracking along – I don’t know about 21 days but brain-vomiting on the page sure is productive. I guess, like most writers, my biggest problem is thinking too much before I write - well if you have to write 10 pages in a day (especially after work), you soon get cured of that!

Went to see Duplicity tonight and was sorely disappointed. This corporate spy-caper has all it needs on paper to be a sparking hit but it misfires all over the place.

Yes, Julia Roberts is on top form and should come out of her self-imposed retirement permanently. And the supporting cast are all excellent. But Clive Owen is completely wrong in what should have been George Clooney’s role and his chemistry with Roberts is non-existent. He is sarcastic and sardonic where the part calls for a schmoozer and he doesn’t the comic timing that you take for granted in someone like Clooney.

I’d advise you to do what I should have done – wait for the DVD…

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Can you write a film in 21 days?

Well I'm giving it a seriously good bash. If you've never heard of Viki King's legendary book on this very subject, check it out. It may have been written over 20 years ago but it's still a brilliant guide to effective speed script writing.

Essentially the idea is that you write like a mother for 7 days and get your entire script down on paper. Then you spend the rest of the time tweaking and doing re-writes and voila, you have a completed script in less than a month. I'm writing a Christmas movie called All I Want for Christmas and am currently on page 20 (I'm on Day Two).

I will report back on how the rest of the writing goes and whether it's possible to come up with a script that isn't rubbish in such a short time....

Can you write a film in 21 days?

Well I'm giving it a seriously good bash. If you've never heard of Viki King's legendary book on this very subject, check it out. It may have been written over 20 years ago but it's still a brilliant guide to effective speed script writing.

Essentially the idea is that you write like a mother for 7 days and get your entire script down on paper. Then you spend the rest of the time tweaking and doing re-writes and voila, you have a completed script in less than a month. I'm writing a Christmas movie called All I Want for Christmas and am currently on page 20 (I'm on Day Two).

I will report back on how the rest of the writing goes and whether it's possible to come up with a script that isn't rubbish in such a short time....

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Raimi is back with a vengeance, plus a rant on cinema etiquette....

I love Sam Raimi's films but it's been a while since he did an out and out horror flick (17 long years since Army of Darkness - I'm not counting The Gift cos it was useless).

So I was really excited to see the trailer for his latest film Drag Me to Hell. See the trailer at www.traileraddict.com/trailer/drag-me-to-hell/trailer

It looks freaky and that bit with the old lady in the bed made me jump - can't WAIT to see the whole thing.

On a totally unrelated note, people often seem to carry out surveys on things like "Ireland's preferred celebrity to have as your cinema date" and someone like George Clooney usually wins. Well, my fantasy cinema companion would be some huge, incredibly threatening-looking martial arts expert. Why? I'm fed up with twats at the movies yakking on and kicking the back of my seat! I want a guy so scary that if he stands up and tells someone to shut up, they will. Or who can carry out a Vulcan neck pinch and render them speechless. If anyone out there fits that description and likes films, get in touch. This could be the start of a beautiful friendship. Or a court case.

Rant over, I'm off to read Viki King's classic book on writing a movie in 21 days....

Raimi is back with a vengeance, plus a rant on cinema etiquette....

I love Sam Raimi's films but it's been a while since he did an out and out horror flick (17 long years since Army of Darkness - I'm not counting The Gift cos it was useless).

So I was really excited to see the trailer for his latest film Drag Me to Hell. See the trailer at www.traileraddict.com/trailer/drag-me-to-hell/trailer

It looks freaky and that bit with the old lady in the bed made me jump - can't WAIT to see the whole thing.

On a totally unrelated note, people often seem to carry out surveys on things like "Ireland's preferred celebrity to have as your cinema date" and someone like George Clooney usually wins. Well, my fantasy cinema companion would be some huge, incredibly threatening-looking martial arts expert. Why? I'm fed up with twats at the movies yakking on and kicking the back of my seat! I want a guy so scary that if he stands up and tells someone to shut up, they will. Or who can carry out a Vulcan neck pinch and render them speechless. If anyone out there fits that description and likes films, get in touch. This could be the start of a beautiful friendship. Or a court case.

Rant over, I'm off to read Viki King's classic book on writing a movie in 21 days....

Wednesday, March 4, 2009

A Girl and her Dog....

I've finished Heartstoppers! It's a 136-page block which will need to be reviewed and seriously cut but I don't care. The worst part is over, the first draft is done....

I noticed that Wendy and Lucy is out this week so I thought I'd do a review of it based on seeing it in Austin last year. Michelle Williams plays the young drifter Wendy, who arrives in a run-down Washington town with her golden labrador Lucy.

Wendy is already perilously close to the breadline when we meet her - sleeping in her car in her threadbare clothes as she heads towards Alaska and the chance of a job in a canning factory. The events of the film quickly push her over the edge into total despair: Lucy goes missing, her car breaks down and the locals run from friendly and helpful to uncaring and malevolent. We never find out much about Wendy or what she is running from but Williams' raw and uncompromising performance more than makes up for this.

This is not a film that fills you with hope or joy but is instead a brave depiction of life on the edge of poverty. Wendy may be poor, but so are many of the people she meets and the town as a whole seems to be struggling to survive. While you will leave the cinema with unanswered questions, they are, perhaps, questions that need to be asked.

A Girl and her Dog....

I've finished Heartstoppers! It's a 136-page block which will need to be reviewed and seriously cut but I don't care. The worst part is over, the first draft is done....

I noticed that Wendy and Lucy is out this week so I thought I'd do a review of it based on seeing it in Austin last year. Michelle Williams plays the young drifter Wendy, who arrives in a run-down Washington town with her golden labrador Lucy.

Wendy is already perilously close to the breadline when we meet her - sleeping in her car in her threadbare clothes as she heads towards Alaska and the chance of a job in a canning factory. The events of the film quickly push her over the edge into total despair: Lucy goes missing, her car breaks down and the locals run from friendly and helpful to uncaring and malevolent. We never find out much about Wendy or what she is running from but Williams' raw and uncompromising performance more than makes up for this.

This is not a film that fills you with hope or joy but is instead a brave depiction of life on the edge of poverty. Wendy may be poor, but so are many of the people she meets and the town as a whole seems to be struggling to survive. While you will leave the cinema with unanswered questions, they are, perhaps, questions that need to be asked.