Sunday, June 12, 2011

Fix-it thoughts come when you least expect them...

First of all, good news. Producer Lady's company came back and signed the option and sent me a copy. So it looks like my dollar option deal is underway - officially! Now I'll keep my paws crossed that they make the movie and give me a feature credit already.

Having finished my Star on the Run rewrite, I'm now on to rewriting another script. Or should I say, scripts, because I have three to choose from. I've been thinking about them all for the last week and little nuggets keep coming to mind at the most random times. I was stuck at a traffic light yesterday and I suddenly thought of a way to fix this thriller. I was watching another movie on Friday's night and it struck me that the characters in another film should be younger.

I don't want to sound pretentious, but I think this sort of gestation period is important for writing. Writers don't seem to think like everyone else anyway, and I've always been someone who got in trouble in the past for staring into space, dwelling on something random about a short story or this terrible novel I wrote in school.

We need days of staring at a pot of coffee but also days of routine, because the best thoughts come to me when my conscious brain has switched off, immersed in a boring task like hoovering. This time is when the real business of rewriting gets started, when the existing script gets picked apart and the solution to putting it together again starts to emerge from the fog. Hopefully...

The IFI are showing a season of 1970s thriller at the moment and I highly recommend checking out Cutter's Way, which I saw last week. A brilliant character piece, it stars the underrated John Heard as disabled vet Alex Cutter and Jeff Bridges as his charming conman friend, who each become obsessed with solving a local girl's murder. (It was a shock to see Bridges, about ten stone lighter than he is now and nowhere near as hairy). This is a kind-of thriller, but it's much more about the people than the plot and is easily the last great film of the American New Wave. They don't make 'em like this anymore...

No comments: